what is homeostasis | Homeostasis flashcards

Click to flip

C
H
O
O
S
E

T
O
P
I
C

Choose a topic


what is physiology? physiology is the study of how the body works to maintain life
who were the founding fathers of physiology? Claude Bernard and Walter Brandford Cannon
what is homeostasis? homestasis is the attempt of the body to maintain a constant internal environment. It is essential for the survival and function of living cells
what is homeostatic regulation? it is the adjustment of physiological systems within the body to maintain a stable internal environment
what does homeostatic regulation involve? it involves the receptors, the control centers and the effectors
what is the function of the receptor? it receives information from the environment that the environmental conditions might be changing
what is the function of the control center of integration center? it is the processing center for the information from the receptor
what is the effector? it carries out the commands from the control center by enhancing or opposing stimulus
is homeostasis a static or dynamic process? homeostasis is a dynamic process.
Does each cell contribute to the relatively stable internal environment? yes
The control system is grouped into two classes? intrinsic and extrinsic
What are intrinsic controls? these are local controls that are inherent in an organ
what are extrinsic controls? these are regulatory mechanisms initiated outside an organ.
what body system exhibit extrinsic controls? nervous system and endocrine systems
what is negative feedback? this is a response that reverses the direction of change. For example, when there is an increase of carbon dioxide in the body, the lungs are signaled to start expelling more carbon dioxide
what is positive feedback? this is a response that amplifies the change. It has a destabilizing effect, so does not result in homeostasis. It is less common in nature. Example of positive feedback is the secretion of oxytocin which provides a pathway for the uterus to contact, therefore assisting in child birth
what is feedforward regulation? this is the response made in anticipation of a change
how does nutrition alter homeostasis? the lack of proper nutrition will cause your cells to function poorly. For example if your cells have an acute lack iron, this may cause reduced oxygen carrying capacity. If severe, the body might try to compensate by increasing cardiac output, leading to palpitation and possible heart failure.
how do toxins alter homeostasis? any interference of cellular functions will cause a malfunction in the cell. For example in a drug overdose, an individuals vital signs begin to waver, this can cause problems such as brain damage or even death
How does you mental health alter homeostasis? thoughts and our emotional states create chemical changes to take place in the body. This could be a good thing or a bad thing (e.g when depressed)
how does genetics alter homeostasis? genetics can cause certain weaknesses or strengths. This can cause genetic diseases

what is physiology?

who were the founding fathers of physiology?

what is homeostasis?

what is homeostatic regulation?

what does homeostatic regulation involve?

what is the function of the receptor?

what is the function of the control center of integration center?

what is the effector?

is homeostasis a static or dynamic process?

Does each cell contribute to the relatively stable internal environment?

The control system is grouped into two classes?

What are intrinsic controls?

what are extrinsic controls?

what body system exhibit extrinsic controls?

what is negative feedback?

what is positive feedback?

what is feedforward regulation?

how does nutrition alter homeostasis?

how do toxins alter homeostasis?

How does you mental health alter homeostasis?

how does genetics alter homeostasis?

Front
Back
ADD NEW CARD

Sign in or Create an account to leave comments.